Tag Archives: Twelve Bridges

Tit Sin Kyun: Hung Kyun’s Internal Training Form

Simon Lam Chun Chung - Iron Wire Set (Tit Sin Kyun)

Tit Sin Kyun was a form passed down from Tit Kiu Saam (Iron Bridge Three), one of the ten tigers of Canton and a grandmaster of Hung Ga Kyun. The form was taught to Grandmaster Wong Fei Hung by Lam Fuk Sing, one of the students of Tit Kiu Saam.

Tit Sin Kyun is an internal form (Noi Gung 內功) of the Lam Ga Hung Kyun System. There is a common misconception that Tit Sin Kyun trains self defence techniques. Rather than solely training self defence techniques, Grandmaster Lam Chun Chung suggests that Tit Sin Kyun utilizes dynamic tension, breathing exercises and pronunciation of sounds to generate power in the practitioner’s bridge hands, improve rooting of the practitioner’s stance and improve the overall health of a practitioner by treating each of the five major organs of the human body (i.e. Liver, Heart, Spleen, Lungs and Kidneys). Continue reading

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Applying the Bridging Techniques of Hung Ga

Applying the Bridging Techniques of Hung Ga

The Hung Ga system is well known for its “Iron bridge hand training”. Traditionally, there are twelve distinct Hung Ga bridge hand methods, each having a different shape, associated technique and mode of practice. The various bridge hand techniques are exemplified in different classical Hung Ga forms (Tit Sin Kyun, Gung Ji Fuk Fu Kyun, etc.). Amongst Hung Ga practitioners, the Twelve Bridges are a continual source of conversation, intrigue and even confusion. Continue reading

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Hung Ga’s Twelve Bridges Explained in Twelve Lines (Practical, Plain & Simple)

Hung Ga’s Twelve Bridges

Question:  Sifu Macek, can you please briefly explain the “Twelve Bridge Hands” of Hung Ga Kuen? As your school is called Practical Hung Kyun, I would appreciate some practical example how to use the “Twelve Bridges” in training or real fight.

Jorge C.

Answer: First two Bridges – Hard, Soft (Gong, Yau) and last two Bridges – Control, Adapt (Jai, Ding) are a general Yam/Yeung (Yin/Yang) framework of the remaining eight. We at Practical Hung Kyun want to end up the confrontation as fast as possible, using hard power and total control. If we meet a stronger opponent, we use soft power and adapt to the opponents action.

I took your question as challenge, and tried to explain the “Twelve Bridge Hands” of Hung Ga in twelve lines/paragraphs. Continue reading

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