Category Archives: Guest Articles

Legends of the Old Hung Ga Kyun Masters: “Iron Bridge Three” Tit Kiu Saam

Legends of the Old Hung Ga Kyun Masters: "Iron Bridge Three" Tit Kiu Saam

Everyone says that Hung style, Lau style, Choi style, Lei style and Mok style are five famous styles in Southern Chinese martial arts. Among these, the Hung style has the most disciples. In the past fifty or sixty years, the Hung style exponents such as Wong Fei Hung, Lam Sai Wing, Taam Man and others have become famous among younger practitioners in Southern China. Continue reading

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Announcement from Grand Master Lam Chun Fai: “Iron Wire Fist” (Tid Sin Kyun) Book + DVD Project

Announcement from Grand Master Lam Chun Fai: "Iron Wire Fist" (Tit Sin Kyun) Book + DVD Project

Grandmaster Lam Chun Fai has started writing his 3rd Hung Kyun book on “Iron Wire Fist” (Tid Sin Kyun). The targeted release date of this book will be announced in the fall. The Tid Sin Kyun is an advanced level set and it is not usually taught until the practitioner has many years of experience in Hung Kyun training.  Continue reading

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Grandmaster Lam Cho Explains the Origins of Lau Ga Kyun and Lau Ga Gwan

Grandmaster Lam Cho Explains the Origins of Lau Ga Kyun and Lau Ga Gwan

One of my fondest memories of my Sigung (師公), the Great-Grandmaster Lam Cho, was when he would put on his three-piece suit, pick up a newspaper, and take a brisk walk for lunch at his favorite restaurant, where he had a table reserved daily, between the hours of 1:00-2:30pm. On the occasion of one visit, in the early 1990’s, I had brought a variety of Chinese martial art books from my home in San Francisco, USA.

Arriving at Lam Kwoon (林館), Great-Grandmaster Lam Cho and my Sifu (師父), Grandmaster Lam Chunsing were ready to have lunch, and so we walked together, to Sigung’s restaurant, the old Joy Fook Lau Seafood Restaurant (彩福海鮮酒樓), on the fourth floor of the Pioneer Centre, 750 Nathan Road. On this particular day, I had brought the books with me, with the intention of discussing them with my Sifu. Continue reading

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The Hung Ga Fraternity, Then, Now, and Future

Five Shaolin Masters

Hung Ga (Designating “the House of the First Ming Emperor”) was originally founded as a Han Chinese patriotic coalition, more specifically, an anti-Qing fraternity. With the Opium Wars, “The Eight-Nation Alliance”, and Japanese involvement with the Qing Court, we again see Han fraternal bonding as an answer to foreign incursion, by the formation of the “Ten Tigers of Gwong Dung”, and other like-minded associations, all under the blanket name of “Hung”. Continue reading

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Practicing the Art”: A Short Hung Ga Kyun Video by Viktor Nordgren

Practicing the Art": A Short Hung Ga Kyun Video by Viktor Nordgren

Making a Kung Fu movie has been a dream of mine. Today, this dream has become reality.

Although it is not a full feature movie it’s a short clip containing the most representative set of Hung Kyun, Fu Hok Seung Ying Kyun. The main focus in this clip is simply the Tiger and Crane techniques, how they look in the hand form as well as the sparring form, it also includes some more techniques as you will see. Continue reading

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No-Nonsense Gung Fu

Hap Ga (Hop Gar) Gung Fu

Hap Ga has been has been among China’s most-effective fighting style for more than 300 years. “Hap Ga gained a reputation in Canton for being a no-nonsense practical style of Gung Fu.”

The roots of Hap Ga date back to the mid-19th century, when Wong Yan Lam brought his Tibetan crane style of Gung Fu to south China. The style gained a reputation in Canton for being a no-nonsense practical style of Gung Fu, because it adheres to a set of specific methods and principles. Continue reading

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Applying the Bridging Techniques of Hung Ga

Applying the Bridging Techniques of Hung Ga

The Hung Ga system is well known for its “Iron bridge hand training”. Traditionally, there are twelve distinct Hung Ga bridge hand methods, each having a different shape, associated technique and mode of practice. The various bridge hand techniques are exemplified in different classical Hung Ga forms (Tit Sin Kyun, Gung Ji Fuk Fu Kyun, etc.). Amongst Hung Ga practitioners, the Twelve Bridges are a continual source of conversation, intrigue and even confusion. Continue reading

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Branding vs. System in Martial Arts

Traditional Martial Arts vs. MMA

The internet bombards us with all of the different martial arts, each with their unique branding and message. They are all about ‘lifestyles’ and each art or style seems to have an associated ‘lifestyle’, whether Tai Chi, Muay Thai, BJJ, MMA, Krav Maga, Kali or whatever, they all seem very distinct in their culture, approach and message.

A recent article by Rickson Gracie (read HERE) criticises modern MMA. He says it is basically a thug culture, and you would not send your child to MMA, however, BJJ was different because it taught positive values, respect etc. I believe there is some truth in this, but disagree on a number of levels. Continue reading

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Do you train with Hung Ga Iron or Brass Rings?

Hung Ga Iron or Brass Rings?

One of the things that drew me many years ago to Hung Ga was the use of Iron Rings.

Because of my attraction to the idea of training with the Ring, I searched for posts and literature on them.  I have read many documents and posts about why people think they are a valuable training tool and also why many people think that they are pointless or have been superseded by modern tools.

Even between the two lineages of Hung Ga Kyun in which I have trained my two different Sifu’s have had different views as to which forms you are allowed to use them to train with. Continue reading

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How to Unlock Your Martial Power

Shaolin CrawlingFor the martial artist looking to improve his craft, there are a few bare essentials you need – apart from your actual martial arts practice – that will help propel you toward and beyond your goals.  A healthy level of strength and a good program for all-over conditioning.

The more time you spend doing other exercises, the less time you get to practice your art.  And each strength and conditioning movement you practice should ideally have a strong carryover into your striking, kicking, grappling, etc. Continue reading

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