Category Archives: Guest Articles

Legends of the Old Hung Ga Kyun Masters: Lau Jaam

The Story of Hung Ga Kyun Grandmaster Lau Jaam

Cantonese martial art Master Mr. Wong Fei Hung, among his inheritors, there were two famous names, one being verified as Leung Fun, and the next was apparently Mr. Lau Jaam. They both as known-brave and skillful in fighting, outstanding in the Wong Fei Hung. Leung Fun died early, and Lau Jaam healthy and still alive. In martial art Lau was in no way weaker than Leung. They treated Lau as junior to Leung. But actually Lau was not learning from Wong Fei Hung, instead he was the pupil of Lam Sai Wing.

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Pavel Macek Sifu on Attaining Balance, Practical Martial Arts and Being Strong [Podcast]

Pavel Macek Sifu on Attaining Balance, Practical Martial Arts and Being Strong - Podcast

Health, strength, and practical combat skills – these are some of the main themes of Robin Gamble Sifu’s Scholar-Warrior podcast with Practical Hung Kyun Chief Instructor, Pavel Macek Sifu.

Gamble Sifu’s motto of the podcast is simple:

“To become a Scholar Warrior is to become a truly balanced, cultured and cultivated person”

In this episode of the Scholar-Warrior podcast you find out how Pavel Macek Sifu: Continue reading

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The Unique Skill of the Double Dragon Sabres

In the Hung Kyun collection of Mr. Lam Jou, one of the most classic weapon skill is “Double Dragon Sabre” (Seung Lung Dou), it is the set that master Lam Jou often performed in his time.

The predecessor of Seung Lung Dou has not been previously investigated. However, the pattern of this sword set is similar to  “Single Battle Sword” (Daan Pok Dou 單朴刀). Comparing Seung Lung Dou to Geui Chung Dou the former uses different kind of blades. It should also be pointed out that Seung Lung Dou and the Cantonese “Butterfly Knives” (Wu Dip Dou) have a different origin. So we can assume that Seung Lung Dou was created in the beginning of the 20th century when different martial art styles came together in Hong Kong, perhaps this set is a result of inter-exchange between areas and cultures, it is also Lam Jou’s mastery and comprehensive study of Northern and Southern martial arts. Continue reading

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Hung Kyun’s Traveler’s Staff [Rare Video of Full Set]

Hung Kyun's Traveler’s Staff

The Hang Je Pang is the only double-ended staff set of Lam Family Hung Kyun, it is a set that Lam Jou incorporated to the Lam Family Hung Kyun. The set originates from another style of martial art.

The specific origin of this set, the “Traveler’s Staff”, also known as the “Monkey Pole”, is not well known, some say that it comes from a Northern martial art, whereas some say that it comes from the “Monkey Fist” of Fujian. Regardless of its origin, Lam Jou did some changes to the original set. He made adjustments to the arrangements and techniques, so the “Traveler’s Staff” we know today has a classic Hung Ga flavor to it. Continue reading

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Tit Sin Kyun: Hung Kyun’s Internal Training Form

Simon Lam Chun Chung - Iron Wire Set (Tit Sin Kyun)

Tit Sin Kyun was a form passed down from Tit Kiu Saam (Iron Bridge Three), one of the ten tigers of Canton and a grandmaster of Hung Ga Kyun. The form was taught to Grandmaster Wong Fei Hung by Lam Fuk Sing, one of the students of Tit Kiu Saam.

Tit Sin Kyun is an internal form (Noi Gung 內功) of the Lam Ga Hung Kyun System. There is a common misconception that Tit Sin Kyun trains self defence techniques. Rather than solely training self defence techniques, Grandmaster Lam Chun Chung suggests that Tit Sin Kyun utilizes dynamic tension, breathing exercises and pronunciation of sounds to generate power in the practitioner’s bridge hands, improve rooting of the practitioner’s stance and improve the overall health of a practitioner by treating each of the five major organs of the human body (i.e. Liver, Heart, Spleen, Lungs and Kidneys). Continue reading

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Some Misconceptions of “Iron Thread Set” (Tit Sin Kyun)

Some Misconceptions of “Iron Thread Set" (Tit Sin Kyun)

There are a lot of stories on Tit Sin Kyun, the Iron Thread set, creating a mystic air. Some are nothing more than misconceptions and misinterpretations, partly because the Taoist holistic idea is not always easily translated into Western concepts.

This article will go into some often-heard misconceptions heard in the West and offers some references to other comparable current Western concepts. Continue reading

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The Lam Family: Three Generations of Hung Kyun

Lam Family Hung Kyun

During the 20th century it is said that Hung, Lau, Choi, Lei, Mok were the five big Gung Fu styles of the Guangdong province. Different regions shaped distinctive styles of martial arts, like the Lung Ying Kyun, Southern Praying Mantis, Mok Ga Kyun of the Hakka minority in Eastern Guangdong. The area of Xinhui, Jiangmen, Yangjiang was dominated by Choi Lei Fat. In Chaoshan Choi Mok Kyun was the dominating style. In the martial arts schools as well as the martial arts culture of Guangzhou, Foshan and other big cities were influenced by external elements. Continue reading

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The 10 Sounds of “Iron Thread Set” (Tit Sin Kyun)

 "Iron Thread Set" (Tit Sin Kyun)

Tit Sin Kyun is the highest set in Hung Ga Kyun. Simply said, it’s a Five Elements “Internal Training” set that uses sounds that refer to emotions.

There is much more to Tit Sin Kyun, such as the “Twelve Bridge Arms” (Sap Yi Ji Kiu Sau) and its use in ground grappling/antigrappling, but we will not go into that here. Perhaps another article.
For now we will just focus on the sounds.

The sounds in Tit Sin Kyun are primal sounds, used for boosting the power/spirit on a technical level and for releasing mental and muscle tension. Continue reading

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Lam Family Hung Kyun: About Carrying the Tradition Forward and Innovation

Family and lineage have been important values in Chinese history since ancient times. In other words, the family shrines have been important symbols. Its position within the community can be compared to a church in Western countries, a place for religion and belief. The comparison between western churches and Chinese family shrines can be applied to physical education, traditional Chinese martial arts have been taught from one generation to the next and developed during that process. This kind of passing knowledge from one generation to the next is common in traditional Chinese culture. In this tradition, family bloodline has been an important aspect. All the famous South Chinese martial arts, Hung, Lau, Choy, Lei, Mok, are all surnames. Thus, the development of martial arts have been inherited from one generation to the next which has given each category a specific features. Some varieties of martial arts have kept their knowledge within their families and they have not been allowed to teach outsiders. Continue reading

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Choose to be Flexible Steel!

Side split - Flexible Steel

While being a youngster doing martial arts of course I did a lot of stretching. Mostly it was ‘relax stretching’. I never was really flexible, but then again, it wasn’t really needed for Kempo and traditional Kungfu. Dynamically I could kick about the height of my head, and that was enough. Continue reading

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